Greek-Gods.Info- Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece
First Gods Olympian Gods Demigods & Spirits Monsters Greek Heroes Ancient Greece Ancient Theatre Games
Greek Gods» Aphrodite» Myths about Aphrodite » Aphrodite and Anchises

Aphrodite and Anchises

Venus and Anchises by Annibale CarracciThere was a time when Aphrodite desired a handsome young man from Troy. His name was Anchises. To seduce him, Aphrodite decided to transform herself into a mortal woman. So she went to her home inPaphos, in Cyprus, where the Graces bathed and perfumed her.hen she dressed up beautifully and transformed herself into a young princess from Phrygia, in what is now Turkey

Cheerfully she went to Mount Ida to Anchises, who was there tending his cattle, and stood before him and said:

"Anchises, my father wants me to marry you because you are noble.
I have come a long way just for you.
And I know how to speak your language because I was brought up by a Trojan nurse."



Moved by love and not really knowing what he was doing, Anchises lay down next to Aphrodite. The couple gave birth to two sons, Aeneas (the mythical ancestor of the Romans) and Lyros.

But one day, Aphrodite decided to put her actual clothes back on and reveal her true identity. Slowly she went to the bed of Anchises and asked him:

"Tell me, do I look the same as the day you first saw me?"


Anchises became frightened and begged the goddess to spare his life.

"You don't have to be afraid, as long as you promise not to tell anyone that you slept with a goddess...", Aphrodite told him.

But soon the day came when Anchises got drunk and began to brag to his friends that he was loved by the goddess Aphrodite herself.

When Zeus, the king of the gods, learned of his arrogance, he became very angry. Enraged, he struck Anchises with his smoking thunderbolt and crippled the hero.




Greek Gods» Aphrodite» Myths about Aphrodite
Myths about Aphrodite

Aphrodite and the Weasel

A fable by Aesop




Greek Mythology from A to Z »

© Copyright 2021 Greek-Gods.info All rights reserved